• Van Munching Hall Room 1528 (map)
  • 7699 Mowatt Lane
  • College Park, MD, 20740
  • United States
 Junming Zhu  Associate Professor at the School of Public Policy and Management at Tsinghua University

Junming Zhu

Associate Professor at the School of Public Policy and Management at Tsinghua University

The Center for Global Sustainability is pleased to welcome Junming Zhu to the CGS Forums of the Fall 2018 semester.

Junming Zhu is an Associate Professor at the School of Public Policy and Management at Tsinghua University. His research focuses on policy, economic and behavioral aspects of environmental and sustainability issues. His research has been supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the US National Science Foundation. He is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Industrial Ecology and a Research Fellow of the Center for Industrial Development and Environmental Governance and the Institute for Sustainable Development Goals. Prior to joining Tsinghua, Junming worked at Yale University and Northeastern University. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Environmental Science and Engineering at Tsinghua University, and his Ph.D. in Policy Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Dr. Zhu will be presenting on How Voluntary Environmental Standards Induced Innovation in China.

The effectiveness of voluntary environmental policies is often considered uncertain, depending on the presence of other complementary policies or potential escalation of regulation. Based on firm-level statistics, disaggregate patent information, and difference-in-differences estimation, this paper investigates innovation effects of a set of voluntary standards for cleaner production in China. The authors found that these standards induced significant technology innovation for water pollution control. The innovation effect is independent of any general or specific deterrence, is driven by performance-based indicators in the standards, and is augmented by other policies that refer to the standards. The findings are consistent over alternative estimation strategies and robustness checks. They show that proper design of voluntary policies could serve as a yardstick – for both firms and the government – to facilitate firm innovation.